LA Marathon Race Recap

It was wonderful to be out on the course with my two kids

I finally made it to the LA Marathon. Way back in 2015 this was supposed to be my 2nd marathon, but I chickened out a few days before the race. It was going to be a hot day and I think I was still traumatized from the very hot conditions in my first marathon the previous September. Backing out was a good decision because I clearly wasn’t ready. A month later, I joined a running group to train for the 2015 Ventura Marathon and had a great experience.

That seems like so long and so many marathons ago! This was my 11th marathon. So how did it go? Not as good as I’d hoped and better than I’d hoped.

Achilles taped and happy. I do need to do more work on my posture

Training went well. I successfully pushed my volume to that I had a couple 50+ miles weeks and was averaging mid-40s for the bulk of the training. I had to be careful here because I have been dealing with an unhappy achilles and didn’t want to make it worse. So, working with both a chiropractor and a PT, I was able to carefully increase the mileage while healing. I had a couple of weeks that I had to back off and that’s ok. The therapy along with daily mobility work has given me some pretty healthy calves…and a happy achilles. Note: I don’t recommend running with an injury unless you are working with a professional who gives you the ok and is continuing to monitor. If I’d worked with my team sooner my achilles would have healed long ago.

Knowing that the LAM course is hilly, when my achilles felt ok, I also trained on hills as much as I could. A group of us even drove down to LA to get in a 20 mile course run.

I’ve done a good job of incorporating strength training and have been doing workouts from Jay Dicherry’s Running Rewired. All in all I felt prepared.

A last comment on training – it’s been colder than normal this winter. We had lots of training runs with temperatures in the 40s. It was great for training and totally not normal for SoCal.

Sleep and Diet
I attribute this to menopause, but I don’t sleep as well as I used to. I especially don’t sleep well when I’m away from home. The night before The San Francisco Marathon I slept horribly, in fact I don’t think I slept. I was hoping for something better, but just in case I got in some good quality rest in the week before the race. Unfortunately I didn’t sleep well the night before this race either…but it wasn’t as bad as San Francisco. Thankfully I felt fine in the morning.

As to diet, I quit eating meat about 5 weeks before the race. I note this, but also don’t think it had a big impact, which is fine. I do think that on none race nights I’ve been sleeping a bit better. Maybe from my diet? I’m not sure.

My daughter and me in our starting corral

Race Morning
We (my, son, and daughter) arrived at Dodger Stadium at about 5:30am. We went inside to look and take a photo. Lots of people were sitting (trying to sleep) in the stands. But the seats were wet, so we left. We walked around a little and found a place to hang out, eat a snack, and take of the clothes that would go in our drop bags.

We then did our warm ups, waited in line for the bathrooms, and then found our way to our corrals.

My daughter gave me this shirt on the day I qualified for my first Boston Marathon. I have to earn the right to wear it again! I was hoping to wear it last Sunday. Hopefully that will happen in July.

My Goal
One mistake I made was that my A (9:09 pace), B (9:15 pace), and C (9:20 pace) goals were too close together. All of them would have gotten me a Boston qualifying time and would have been a PR. My PR is 4:04:49, a 9:21 pace, run on a downhill course. I was optimistic because I believe I am in better shape than when I ran that PR.

The Race
Well…this didn’t turn out as I expected. I thought I started slow enough and was well within my goal paces, but I still had great struggles on those later hills.

One frustration was that my Garmin (Fenix) was off from the very beginning. I understand that this is always a possibility, but so far it has been off so much in races that my goals/training paces are way off target. This day I was very diligent about running the tangents and by the end of the race I was still off by .40 (why can’t it ever be in my favor? 😜)

When I reached the halfway point, I was on pace according to my watch but I knew that was meaningless and according to the race clock I was already 2 minutes behind. There’s no real making up that much of a gap. I really have to stop looking at time! Because then I had to convince myself to keep trying.

The hills in the second half were way harder than they were when we did our course run. I remembered that the climbing was hard in that run, but not as hard as I was currently experiencing. I also knew that when I got to Sepulveda, it would be even harder. And it was!

Thankfully there were a lot of people here cheering and encouraging us runners. I want to give a shout-out to the Pasadena Pacers Run Club. They had a huge group out there to support their runners. When the saw someone from their club coming they’d shout out that a Pacer was coming. Then a club member would go out and run with them for a few minutes. That was great! If I lived nearby I’d seriously think about joining their run club.

As I climbed Sepulveda and then Wilshire, I was looking forward to the downhill finish. I kept thinking that I would at least redeem a little bit of my time. Once I got there I did go faster, but my quads were on fire and what seemed fast to me was barely my easy run pace. So much for that!

I ended up completing the race in 4:26:16. This was 16 minutes slower than what I need to go back to Boston and thus 16 minutes (or more) slower than all of my goal paces for the day. Oh well. I think I will still get it at Jack and Jill.

Two More Observations

First – Street Preachers
There were two different street preachers out in the first third of the race. One man was standing on a bridge yelling down at us as we passed my. The other had a portable amp for his “preaching.” They were both sharing “hellfire and brimstone” messages. I wanted to yell at them both to “shut-up.” Seriously, what do they think they are doing except trying to bring attention to themselves? They were certainly not sharing anything remotely close to the love that God has for us…and for our world.

A better role model was found in the athletes who were running for World Vision and its mission of helping communities access clean water. That says a lot more about God and our sharing of God’s love.

Second – Road Conditions & Yeah for Trail Running
Overall I’d say that the course was nice. But there were a few spots where the road was buckled, or where there were unpatched holes. Considering all of our rain, I wasn’t surprised. I was also thankful that I occasionally run trails. I think that the experience of running on uneven surfaces helps to prepare your body to respond and thus prevent injury. I would definitely recommend occassionally hitting the trails for all runners.

I Almost Forgot the Better Than Expected Part
Although I did not run as fast as I’d hoped, it seems that many others did not either. So, I did way better than I imagined in the standings.
Division (F55-59): 35 out of 360 (top 10%)
Female: 1,153 of 8,224 (top 14%)
Overall: 4,801 of 20,029 (top 24%)

Pray (photo-a-day) #rethinkchurch #marathon #run

Sunrise runs can be quite the prayerful start to your day

When do you pray? Maybe it’s because I wasn’t raised in a church I never developed a set prayer time. For many years I would end my day with prayer, lying in bed and thanking God for the day. I still do this on occasion. Since I began running, much of my prayer practice has been a “while running” prayer time. I didn’t start running with this spiritual practice. I actually started running in an attempt to lose weight, but along the way things changed. This was quite the sup-rise and I am grateful.

Grace found in Small Steps

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An uphill journey might seem hard, but the view at the top is worth every step.

The other day I was listening to the Rich Roll Podcast and his interview of Zach Bush, MD. You can listen to it here: RichRoll Podcast – Zach Bush, MD

There was much to be alarmed about in this podcast, especially in the way our farming and use of pesticides is responsible for much illness and other problems. But the message from Zach was also one of hope and promise for the future.

The most impactful statement…the one that made me stop what I was doing, find some paper and pencil, and make a note was Zach’s scientific definition of grace.

Previously I’d never thought of a scientific definition of grace. Here is what he said:

Grace scientifically is that you heal faster than you injure.

I love this definition and can find so much truth in its simplicity…not just scientifically but in life. There is so much hope in these words.

You heal faster than you injure.

Simple decisions that lead to simple changes can lead to healing. This idea is not that making a small change will lead to overnight improvement. But rather our simple changes (which if truly simple are also small), lead over time to big transformation.

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Oatmeal and berries…much better than what I used to eat for breakfast.

Some examples that come to mind:

  • Choosing healthy food will lead to a healthier body over time. The effects of past poor choices don’t disappear immediately but they do over time. My own experience of this is that by (mostly) eliminating processed food from my diet and replacing it with real, wholesome food, I’ve lost 80 pounds. It took a few years.
  • Choosing to move a bit every day can lead to better fitness. If it’s hard, then start with walking and move from there (or even stay there if that works for you). When I decided to be more active and start running, I could only run 30 seconds before needing to walk. Over time, my body grew stronger and in 2018 I completed my 10th marathon…and marathon number 8 was Boston.
  • Choosing to limit online media can lead to a healthier attitude. I confess that this one is a struggle for me. But I do notice that my decision to refrain from pointless online arguments and to no longer follow certain people has made me a much happier person. I need to take daily steps to further limit the time I spend here (especially on Twitter 🤔)
  • Choosing to mediate or pray regularly helps to clear the mind of distractions. Haha…this one is a work in progress too.

All of these transformations – or potential transformations have been gradual. They are perfect examples of healing (or better health) coming about through small changes. Of course we must acknowledge that better health can also be relative. The starting point often dictates how far we can go, but that doesn’t mean we cannot make some improvement.

Sometimes we fail to take those initial, small steps because the change we seek seems to be so far out of reach that we give up before we start. Or it is painful to start moving. But the experience of grace is that when we take one small step after another we are eventually able to look back and see that we’ve travelled so incredibly far on the road to better health.

How have you been able to experience this grace in your life?

Running with a Cold? A Cautionary Tale

Do you know the conventional wisdom about running with a cold? It’s pretty simple.

If you have a fever, body aches, or symptoms below your neck then DON’T RUN.
Or
If  you only have symptoms above the neck, like a stuffy nose you’re good to go.

This is what you will discover with a simple google search. Here is my screen grab from just such a search from this morning:

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What is not emphasized in much of the online advice is that running when you have a cold takes precious recovery resources away from your body and diverts them to run recovery. When you do this, you are not able to adequately recover from your cold. This should be common sense, but I failed to follow it. I will chalk it up to a lesson that will make me a better coach. Here’s my story.

Lot’s of people are suffering from head colds this time of year. It’s common…almost inevitable. I started to feel the symptoms the Friday before Christmas with a bit of a scratchy throat. My reaction was, “oh no! I don’t have time for this!” For the coming days I had a long run, family event, church, and church again for Christmas Eve. I didn’t have time to be sick and so I effectively willed it away for a few days.

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Race pace portion of my long run on December 22.

The long run on the 22nd was 15 miles with 8 at goal marathon race pace (9:08) for me. I went 4 easy, 8 at goal and 3 easy. It was a wonderful run and I hit my goal pace while feeling good.

 

After the run, I still felt good and our family Christmas party was fun. I felt fine and made it through worship on Christmas Eve thus ending a very busy time in my role as pastor. At 2am on Christmas Day I woke with post-nasal drip hurting my throat. Dang! I only was able to hold it off until I mentally relaxed.

I did take it a bit easy the next couple of days. Instead of joining my run club for a Christmas morning run, I went out with them and walked. I took a couple days off and ran again on Friday. The bad news, I still had chest congestion. The good news, running helped to open up my sinuses…but it was ugly. This run was only 6 miles and felt fine.

I usually run long on Saturday, but had a funeral, so I moved it to Sunday. This meant that my week would have 2 long runs – Sunday and the following Saturday. It also included a New Year’s Day trail run which was (except for blowing my nose so much) one of my best trail runs ever.

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I put in some race pace effort towards the end of the run, mostly because I was desperate to get to a restroom.

Interestingly every run this still felt ok. I had to blow my nose over and over again while I ran, but strangely this was ok, because I was “clearing out my sinuses.” My cold stubbornly persisted throughout the week. The run at the end of the week was 16 miles easy. My son ran with me on a cold (for SoCal) day. I was a bit worried about how I’d feel because I hadn’t shaken the cold, but it ended up being a very pleasurable run. I even felt as if I could keep going when we finished. I successfully ran 49.6 miles that week.

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My son and I before our cold Saturday morning run

 

In retrospect, what this week of running while trying to shake a cold did was prolong the cold, while tiring my body. Enough so that Monday’s run was not bad, but not good either. Then Tuesday’s run made me so tired that I skipped strength training. For Wednesday track I was tired, so I skipped it. I ran on Thursday, which I don’t usually do, and felt ok for the first half, but then cratered for the 2nd half and had to skip strength training again.

Here’s the lesson for me: if anyone that I coach had asked me about running their regular schedule while sick, I would have advised against it. But I did it myself because “those runs felt ok…and all the symptoms were above my neck.” Yesterday, I contacted my own coach (who hasn’t been doing my schedule though) and told him that while I want to coach others I still need a coach! He told me to take three days rest.

And here we are…resting. Hopefully I haven’t set myself back too far. And I have learned a valuable coaching lesson…

Here is some better advice from Coach Jay Johnson: “Should you run with a cold?”

Icebergs – Rediscovering the Lost Body-Connection within Christian Spirituality #3

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From page 31 of “Rediscovering the Lost Body-Connection…”

There is much more going on below the surface! This iceberg analogy resonates with me. Maybe it will with you as well. Briefly, we experience feelings, emotions, and physical sensations all the time. Often we react to these emotions without having a clear understanding of where they came from or what precipitated them.

For much of my life, this reactionary activity resulted in my pushing these feelings aside with food.

Was I happy? Then eat!
Was I sad? Nothing like eating for this!
Was I bored? Hmm, what could I eat?
Was I angry? Nothing like something crunchy and salty.

The problem with this approach was that I was unhealthy…physically, mentally, and spiritually. Learning, instead to explore the “why” behind an emotion, has been a freeing (and difficult) process. I say process because I am still learning here and can safely say that it will be a lifetime of learning, of exploration.

The first step in exploring what was under the water line (the iceberg) was through faith. In knowing that God loves me unconditionally, I could safely and critically interact with old hurts, old failings, old disappointments. This was freeing, but it was mostly the spiritual and mental.

The next step for me came through endurance sport. It was here that I truly learned to love my body and the gift that it is. It was here that I learned that I could endure great hardship…and later say it was “fun” (see Fun? Endurance…Is it fun?). It was here that I’ve learned so much about the holistic nature of faith. It has changed my outlook and given me the desire to help others experience life through endurance and through grace.

Today…food can still be a struggle (The Never-Ending Struggle with Weight). Unfortunately that will always be the case because of biology. But mindfulness and movement can counteract the struggle. If you’d like some help here let me know!

 

 

Rediscovering the Lost Body-Connection within Christian Spirituality – #2

Way back on October 31, 2018 I posted the first of what was to be a series on the above mentioned book. Then I got bogged down in all kinds of stuff…and to be honest the book is not all that easy to write about. Well, also, I’m only on page 38 so that’s maybe not the best excuse. Today, a few quotes that are important.

All of us, especially children, must be encouraged to listen to our bodies as teachers and not as enemies.

Somehow, as a child I learned that my body is the enemy. I was told that I was fat…ugly…lazy and I believed all this. It’s only recently that I’ve learned to love this wonderful body that God has given to me. It is indeed fearfully and wonderfully made…freckles and lumps and all!

I’ve learned this through sport…endurance sport…running to be exact. I wish I had discovered this earlier, but as I keep telling people, “it’s never too late to start.”

Important to my journey (which led to a pastoral call) I discovered the truth that God’s grace is an absolutely free gift. This knowledge has freed me from lots of self-doubt, but I must have thought of it more in the sense of feelings and heart. Today, as I fully realize this grace, I now believe, it can a should lead us to a holistic understanding of our bodies as gifts to be used and cherished and cared for.

What about you? How do you interact with your body today? Is it different from when you were a child?

Day by Day – Marathon Recovery

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Marathon number 10. I missed my goal by A LOT! But I also surprisingly placed 3rd (of 20) in my age group, thus earning this beautiful plaque 

I am continually impressed by the way our bodies are capable of healing themselves. We overwork them to the point of pain, such as in running a marathon. Immediately after  the race the pain starts…or weakness as your legs feel more like jello than anything else.

The negative effects will go away. When you make recovery a priority, they go away faster allowing you to begin working towards that next goal.

 

Last week was my recovery week for the Ventura Marathon. It was also a week to attend a conference. Because I was out of my normal routine I was able to be more intentional and I had a fun way to gauge recovery…the stairs. Here is recovery by day.

Day 1 (Sunday – Race Day)
Immediately after the race. Eat well. Rest. Don’t be too hard on yourself if you didn’t meet your goals. I had to remind myself o this because I didn’t do as well as I’d planned. Immediately after the race a friend gave me a quick massage. I recommend this for everyone! After lunch activities included a shower, compression tights, and a nap.

56195934482__EDB5E544-B761-4575-A054-75A4A104E7B9Day 2 (Monday)
Eat well and rest! This a the day to travel to my conference, meaning a 3-1/2 hour drive out to the desert. Sitting that long was not fun! Thankfully we always have the option to stop the car and walk. Before the long drive, I decided to visit my chiropractor for some active release and adjustments. I also borrowed a set of Elevated Legs from my coach. Both good decisions.

When I arrived at the hotel I learned that my room was on the third floor. Carrying all my luggage, of course I took the elevator. Once at my room I noticed a set of stairs almost directly in front of my room. It would be very hard not to use them. This was an outside stairwell at a resort. Thankfully they weren’t too wide because my first time down the stairs I had to hold the rails. Rather than walking I was using my arms to support those oh so sore quads with each step. Walking back up was painful but doable. I ended the day with 30 minutes of Elevate Legs.

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Not the easiest to navigate post-marathon but it’s very hard to justify an elevator when you’re only on the third floor.

Day 3 (Tuesday)
The most painful post-race day! Up and down the stairs…ouch, ouch, ouch, ouch. I can say I got in some good upper body work as my arms bore most of my weight. Elevated Legs first thing in the morning and right before bed – this time with the little ice packs (thankfully my room had a small refrigerator/freezer).

Day 4 (Wednesday)
Started the day with a slow and easy 1 mile run. I walked down the stairs with noticeably less pain and thought that I could maybe go a bit farther than the assigned 1 mile. Once I started running I immediately thought, “no, I’ll stick to a mile.” Elevated Legs post run. With some free time in the afternoon, I visited the pool. It felt nice to walk around in the water. I had planned to swim some laps but left my goggles at home and didn’t want to buy another pair. I finished the day with Elevated Legs and a glass of wine.

Day 5 (Thursday)
No pain on the stairs! Our bodies are so amazing in their ability to heal.

Day 6 (Friday)
Another 1 mile easy run that felt much better than Wednesday. One last use of the Elevated Legs post-run. Not only were the stairs not painful I was able to move rapidly up and down! I ended the day with the long drive home.

Day 7 (Saturday)
My husband and I did an easy 5 mile trail run. I was amazed at how fresh my legs felt. Then when I was done, my legs told me they were still a bit tire. At this point it’s easy to think that recovery is done. It’s not! Recovery efforts will continue into the next week as I continue with a reverse taper (increasing mileage and strength training).

Thankfully this has all gone well because I have less than 5 weeks before my second 50k. This trail race will be an “easy” effort.